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Could watching a romcom together save your marriage?

15/06/2019 | 南京夜网 | Permalink

Love Actually.Having loved my husband for 20 years we have our fair share of memories. Mostly good. Some not so great. Like that time I convinced him to go and see My Best Friend’s Wedding by failing to tell him that it starred Julia Roberts, an actress he maintains a strange, somewhat unhinged pathological hatred for. Oh, and there was that other time we went to see Clueless. Which he did not get. At all. And don’t get me started on the grief he gives me for watching Drop Dead Diva.
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But now, ladies (and any gentlemen who do not happen to fit the romcom-loathing-male-stereotype), it’s our time to shine. A new study conducted by the respectable University of Rochester in New York suggests that couples who watch romcoms together are better at relationships and less likely to get divorced.

So there.

Authors of the study said that, ‘The results suggest that husbands and wives have a pretty good sense of what they might be doing right and wrong in their relationships. Thus, you might not need to teach them a whole lot of skills to cut the divorce rate. You might just need to get them to think about how they are currently behaving.’

Watching romantic comedies together, the study concludes, can be more effective than marriage counselling if couples discuss the film afterwards.

I like to think my husband and I are pretty good communicators. Yet even so, we are busy with two young kids and don’t get a huge amount of “us” time. Besides, there is always room for improvement, right? So naturally I decided to evaluate the credibility of the “romcom saved my marriage” premise.

While the study used a range of romantic comedies to test its theory, there were no guidelines dictating the kinds of romcoms you can and can’t choose. When I asked my husband for any suggestions he scoffed. “It’s very female-centric, isn’t it? I mean, why can’t we watch a military documentary?”

Hmmm…

In the end we went for Along Came Polly as a tribute to the late Philip Seymour Hoffman, who is kind of hilarious as Ben Stiller’s crass, yet loveable bestie. And even though Jennifer Anniston may not be the world’s greatest actress, she has the inoffensive and accessible girl-next-door charm of many a romcom leading lady.

“We’ve seen this before!” my husband said in the first 10 minutes. “It’s that one where he has all those pillows on the bed like you and she makes fun of him because there’s no point to it.”

We were already getting somewhere. Discussing my home decorating habits. Turns out my husband’s romantic comedy memory storage is better than mine. Who would have thought?

“And the uptight one cheats on him during their honeymoon and then he meets the messy, unstructured woman who teaches Ben Stiller to live a little. Remember?”

Ah yes. So I hadn’t chosen the most memorable film. But still, it would be close to impossible not to laugh out loud when Ben Stiller’s irritable bowel syndrome makes him get all sweaty while eating Moroccan food during his first date with Polly.

Sure it was hard to get a serious relationship discussion going based on the interactions between characters in a cheesy romcom. I was distracted by Jennifer Anniston’s frizz-free boho waves and we couldn’t stop speculating on what it was that drove Philip Seymour Hoffman to heroin abuse.

But sitting in bed on a week night watching a movie on our laptop was the kind of thing we might have done a decade ago, before the responsibility of parenthood took over. And it was really fun, much more fun than if the movie had have been all serious and worthy.

So can romcom viewing replace marriage counselling? Probably not. But if it means having a laugh and spending time with your loved one, go for it. And remember: military documentaries don’t count.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Simone Strobel murder: German police offer reward

15/06/2019 | 南京夜网 | Permalink

Killed on her dream holiday: Simone Strobel. Photo: Supplied Tobias Suckfuell: an inquest heard there was a “strong suspicion” Simone’s boyfriend was involved in her death. Photo: Anthony Johnson
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Nine years have passed since the body of German backpacker Simone Strobel was found, apparently suffocated and hidden on a sports ground near her campsite in northern NSW.

The 25-year-old’s parents in Germany remain haunted by so many unanswered questions about the night of her disappearance in Lismore, on February 11, 2005.

Who would want to kill their daughter, a kindergarten teacher who worked with children with a disability, and who was on a one-year holiday of a lifetime with her German boyfriend?

And what exactly happened to her in the hours after she and her boyfriend, Tobias Suckfuell, and two other companions returned to the Lismore Tourist Caravan Park after a night out drinking at a local pub?

“The answer to that would be extremely important for us,” Ms Strobel’s father Gustl Strobel told German newspaper Main Post in his home town of Wurzburg this week.

“Then we could finally say goodbye. Whether and how someone is punished for us is not so important – but we need to know what happened. “

On the ninth anniversary of her disappearance this week, police in Germany have offered a 10,000 euro ($15,090) reward for information leading to the resolution of the case.

They are hoping that someone in Australia or Germany has information that finally will lead to an arrest and conviction.

Detective Senior Sergeant Dave Mackie, from Casino police, said Ms Strobel and her boyfriend arrived in Australia on August 3, 2004.

The couple, who had been together for six years, planned to travel around the country on a one-year working visa, and had stopped in Lismore less than 24 hours before Ms Strobel vanished.

Mr Suckfuell’s sister Katrin and another friend, Jens Martin, had joined the couple a few weeks before they arrived in Lismore, and were with them at the pub on the night Ms Strobel disappeared.

“On February 11, 2005, they checked in at the tourist caravan park in Lismore, NSW and spent the evening together at a pub in downtown Lismore and afterwards returned with friends to the campsite,” Senior Sergeant Mackie said.

“From there Simone disappeared. Her body was found on a sports ground near the campsite on February 17, 2005.”

Ms Strobel’s body was badly decomposed, naked, and covered with palm fonds at the sports ground about 90 metres from their campsite.

While no definite cause of death could be established, a coroner in 2007 found it was most likely she died of suffocation or smothering asphyxia.

The inquest heard that the group had gone to the hotel, where Ms Strobel was reduced to tears after arguing with Mr Suckfuell. Another row followed at the campsite, witnesses said, after which Ms Strobel stormed off.

By June 2005 the Suckfuells had stopped cooperating with both Australian and German authorities, exercising their right to silence.

The inquest heard that the friend with them on the night, Jens Martin, became suspicious after Ms Strobel’s body was found, and began to question Mr Suckfuell’s insistence they maintain a uniform story about what happened that night.

Mr Martin accepted an invitation to attend the inquest, where he told Deputy NSW Coroner Paul MacMahon that Mr Suckfuell ordered him to lie to the police about the fact he and Ms Strobel had been arguing bitterly.

During that inquest, Mr MacMahon said he had a “very strong suspicion” that at least Tobias and perhaps Katrin Suckfuell were involved in the smothering or suffocation murder of Ms Strobel.

A piece of forensic material at the site where her body was found also supported the suggestion Mr Suckfuell had been present.

“Unfortunately at this stage current technology is not sufficiently advanced to confirm that suggestion,” the coroner said.

He found there was insufficient evidence to recommend charges.

NSW Police and the Prosecutor’s Office in Wurzburg, Germany both opened homicide cases into Ms Strobel’s death.

Senior Sergeant Mackie said the reward was payable to residents both in Germany and Australia.

“It might be a financial incentive for potential witnesses to provide the police with their knowledge not revealed so far,” he said.

Anyone with information has been urged to contact Wurzburg Criminal Police in Germany on 0931/457-1732, or any other police station in Germany or Australia.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

CSL sees bright future for new drug

15/06/2019 | 南京夜网 | Permalink

CSL chief executive Paul Perreault says strong sales growth of the biotechnology giant’s specialty products could see the division grow to be larger than the legacy haemophilia group, which has been hampered by increasing competition.
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The specialty division, which sells diagnostic products and drugs to control bleeding during surgical operations, was the standout performer in CSL’s interim financial results.

The company reported a 3 per cent rise in net profit to $US646 million ($715 million) in the first half of 2013-14. Underlying profit of $US685 million, which removes the effect of a $US39 million legal settlement, beat analyst expectations.

Revenue for the six months ended December 31 rose 5 per cent to $US2.7 billion. The specialty products division accounted for 15 per cent of CSL’s revenue and grew sales at 16 per cent on a constant currency basis to $US403 million.

Mr Perreault said although the specialty division had lower sales than CSL’s Immunoglobulin ($US1.1 billion) and haemophilia ($US550 million) divisions in the half, it had grown at double-digit rates “for the last number of years”.

“We expect those [specialty] products to continue to grow,” he said.

Mr Perreault said the division’s “exceptional” performance was underpinned by the drug Kcentra, which was approved for use in the United States in 2013. Kcentra can reverse the effect of blood thinning agents such as warfarin within two hours, Mr Perreault said.

This action stops the risk of a patient on warfarin ‘bleeding out’ in surgery. “Typically for elective surgeries, the physician will titrate down the [blood thinning agent], but in emergency surgery there’s no time to titrate the dose,” Mr Perrault said. “That’s when patients can get into trouble.”

Mr Perreault said the approval of Kcentra was the United State’s “first change in transfusion medicine in 50 years.”

In a further boost to the demand, the US Food and Drug Administration granted Kcentra ‘orphan drug’ status in August, which prevents competitors from entering the space for seven years. The drug has been marketed in Europe for a number of years under the Beriplex.

UBS analyst Andrew Goodsall said the specialty division was “the one to watch” in the second half of 2014, because Kcentra presented an opportunity for significant revenue growth.

Haemophilia product sales fell 4 per cent on a constant currency basis in the half. Mr Perreault said there were “numerous competitors scrambling” to develop new treatments for the rare disease. This had lead to an increase in clinical trials, which meant many patients were discarding their current regime in favour for free medicines offered as part of trials.

“Haemophilia is a rare disease,” he said. “There aren’t that many patients.”

In addition, a large proportion of CSL’s haemophilia products are sold to healthcare providers on a tender basis, which meant growth tended to be uneven, Mr Perreault said.

However, Mr Perrault said he expected sales growth CSL’s recombinant drugs to treat the disease, so the jostling for size between the specialty and haemophilia divisions would be a “good race.” “It could be a neck and neck race over the next few years,” he said.

In the current half, CSL will embark on a phase two trial of its heart attack prevention drug CSL112, which Mr Perreault said presented “significant potential to transform our business.”

CSL hopes to show that its drug which removes cholesterol from plaques on artery walls will prevent the risk of heart attacks in patients who have already suffered an initial cardiac event. About 80,000 Australians have a heart attack each year and, of those, about 12 per cent suffer a subsequent attack, stroke or die.

Mr Perreault said CSL expects results from its clinical trial towards the end of 2015 or early 2016.

The company announced an interim unfranked dividend of US53¢, which was US3¢ higher than the previous corresponding period. The dividend will be paid on April 4.

CSL shares have gained 21 per cent over the past year. At 12:22pm AEDT, the stock was trading down 3.3 per cent to $67.59.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Best of Sochi: Day 4GALLERY

15/06/2019 | 南京夜网 | Permalink

A competitor trains before the Biathlon Women’s 10km Pursuit during the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Laura Cross-country Ski & Biathlon Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES Jorge F. Birkner Ketelhohn of Argentina skis during training for the Men’s Alpine Skiing on day 4 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Alpine Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES
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Silvan Zurbriggen of Switzerland in action during training for the Men’s Alpine Skiing on day 4 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Alpine Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Sarah Reid of Canada makes a run during a Women’s Skeleton training session on Day 4 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at the Sanki Sliding Center at on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Works spray down the halfpipe before competition begins in the Snowboard Men’s Halfpipe Qualification Heats on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Teodor Peterson of Sweden competes in Qualification of the Men’s Sprint Free during day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Laura Cross-country Ski & Biathlon Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Silvan Zurbriggen of Switzerland skis during training for the Men’s Alpine Skiing on day 4 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Alpine Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Yumie Funayama of Japan slides with the stone during the Curling Women’s Round Robin match between Japan and Republic of Korea during day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Ice Cube Curling Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Shelley Rudman of Great Britain makes a run during a Women’s Skeleton training session on Day 4 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at the Sanki Sliding Center at on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Dara Howell of Canada competes in the Freestyle Skiing Women’s Ski Slopestyle Finals on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Gregory Bretz of the United States competes in the Snowboard Men’s Halfpipe Qualification Heats on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Nikita Avtaneev of Russia competes in the Snowboard Men’s Halfpipe Qualification Heats on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Linnea Backman #17 of Sweden fights for the puck against Nina Kamenik #7 and Kerstin Spielberger #22 of Germany during the Women’s Ice Hockey Preliminary Round Group B game on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Shayba Arena on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Image was created using a variable planed lens) A general view of the action in the men’s round robin session during day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Ice Cube Curling Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Danny Davis of the United States competes in the Snowboard Men’s Halfpipe Qualification Heats on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Scotty James of Australia competes in the Snowboard Men’s Halfpipe Qualification Heats on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Agnieszka Szymanczak of Poland competes in Qualification of the Ladies’ Sprint Fee during day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Laura Cross-country Ski & Biathlon Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Skiers compete in the Finals of the Men’s Sprint Free during day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Laura Cross-country Ski & Biathlon Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Lisa Zimmermann of Germany competes during the Freestyle Skiing Ladies’ Ski Slopestyle Qualification at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Anna Mirtova of Russia falls while competing in the Freestyle Skiing Women’s Ski Slopestyle Qualification on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Devin Logan of the United States slides down the mountain at the end of her run in the Freestyle Skiing Women’s Ski Slopestyle Finals on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Lizzy Yarnold of Great Britain makes a run during a Women’s Skeleton training session on Day 4 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at the Sanki Sliding Center at on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Michelle Lowenhielm (1st L) #28 of Sweden celebrates scoring their third goal against of Germany with her teammates Josefine Holmgren #9, Johanna Olofsson, Cecilia Osterberg and Maria Lind #19 of Sweden in the third period during the Women’s Ice Hockey Preliminary Round Group B game on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Shayba Arena on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Michelle Lowenhielm #28 of Sweden scores their third goal against Jennifer Harss #30 of Germany in the third period during the Women’s Ice Hockey Preliminary Round Group B game on day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Shayba Arena on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Marsha Hudey of Canada competes during the Women’s 500m Race 1 of 2 Speed Skating event during day 4 of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Adler Arena Skating Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Maiken Caspersen Falla of Norway (L) and Ingvild Flugstad Oestberg of Norway celebrate winning first and second place in the Finals of the Ladies’ Sprint Free during day four of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics at Laura Cross-country Ski & Biathlon Center on February 11, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Shirley Temple, 1928-2014PHOTOS, VIDEO

15/06/2019 | 南京夜网 | Permalink

Actress and political activist Shirley Temple has died in her California home at age 85, media outlets have reported.
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Temple started acting at age three and soon became one of the most recognisable child actors in the world.

She appeared in more than 50 films, including Poor Little Rich Girl,The Littlest Rebel(1936),Heidi (1937), Little Miss Broadway (1938),The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer(1946), Fort Apache (1948)and The Story of Seabiscuit(1949).

Shirley Temple, 1936. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple wears a grass skirt and plays a ukulele in a promotional portrait for the musical ‘Captain January’ in 1936. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple, 1935. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple, circa 1944. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple reading some of her fanmail in 1943. Picture: Getty Images

In 1944, Shirley Temple, 17, married Sgt John Agar Jnr, an army aviation engineer, in a Wiltshire Methodist church. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple accepts the Life Achievement Award from presenter Jamie Lee Curtis onstage during the 12th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards in 2006. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple speaks in front of a poster of Richard Nixon at a Republican Party election press conference at the Cafe Royal in London in September 1968. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple in Rome in 1968. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple sitting by her Christmas tree with presents from 20th Century Fox and a decorated Christmas tree in 1936. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple wears a fairy godmother costume in a promotional portrait for her television series of dramatized fairy tales, ‘Shirley Temple’s Storybook’. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple and her first husband John Agar play with their infant daughter, Linda Susan, in the living room of their home in 1948. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple on set circa 1936. Picture: Getty Images

The trademark curls of Shirley Temple. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple at home in Atherton, California, with her daughter Lori in 1957. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple at home in Atherton, California, with her son Charles in 1957. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple and her second husband, Charles Black, pose together at the premiere of ‘Roman Holiday’ in 1953. Picture: Getty Images

Then-President Bill Clinton and wife Hilary applaud Shirley Temple, a recipient of one of the Kennedy Center Honors in 1998. Picture: Getty Images

A Christmas card or promotional portrait of child actress Shirley Temple in the 1930s. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple was presented with a Life Achievement Award at the 12th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards in 2006. Picture: Getty Images

Shirley Temple was presented with a Life Achievement Award at the 12th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards in 2006. Picture: Getty Images